• 51% of women who reported having these experiences at least once report that it came from a male supervisor

  • International aid workers report comments on physical appearance and demands to conform to stereotypes more than national counterparts (statistically significant, p<.05)

  • In the past month before taking the survey, women have felt badly on average 1.7 times due to gender related comments made by colleagues. This number is not associated with age or number of years of experience, and is equal between  national and international workers.

Harassment refers to any unwanted words, actions, or gestures with sexual connotations that create discomfort or concern and that threaten the professional wellbeing of the targeted person. Examples derived from stories from women in the field include:

  • My male boss always invites me for after-work drinks even though I always decline the offer

  • My boss always calls me by nick-names like “dear, honey, sweetie”

  • My colleagues stare at me in a way that makes me uncomfortable during breaks, I hear inappropriate jokes about women in general

  • My colleague tried to touch my breasts and I put him in his place. Since then, several times, he has broken into my computer files and altered them to undermine my work

  • My colleagues, who I share an office with, have pinned up a calendar of scantily-clad women to the wall

  • During a work cocktail, a small sausage fell off of my plate, and my boss said to his other colleagues (all men) “she prefers the big ones”.

  • My boss has confided in me about his sexual preferences

  • I had a relationship with a colleague at work. After we broke up, he made public displays of jealousy in our office

  • I turned down the advances of a male superior, and since then he doesn’t give me work and speaks to me aggressively

  • My boss often stands close enough behind me that I can feel his breath on the back of my neck

  • When I pass in front of the photocopier in stretchy pants, my colleague slaps my butt

Harassment