• Qualitative results confirm that, after reporting, most women felt minimized, judged, or ignored. Two respondents shared instances of being fired after reporting.

  • There were several examples of constructive results, including two instances of the woman being moved to a safer location.

  • Of those women who reported ‘negative professional consequences’ when they reported, 25% say they lost their jobs and 18% report being blocked professionally.

  • When an investigation was carried out, the investigator was in 83% of cases internal to the organization.

Reporting & Repercussion

Qualitative results confirm that, after reporting, most women felt minimised, judged, or ignored. Two respondents shared instances of being fired after reporting. There were several examples of constructive results, including two instances of the women being moved to a safer location.

REASONS FOR NOT REPORTING:

  • Concerned about professional consequences

  • Felt it wasn’t “serious enough” or “violent enough” to report

  • Did not trust the system/anyone

  • Absence of mechanism to report

  • Lack of “proof” and/or knowledge of how to report

  • Dealt with it personally (i.e confronted the abuser)

  • Being told not to report because of a cultural excuse

  • Shame, confusion

  • Fear of reprisal by aggressor

 

  • When women denounce these acts, they reported it first to the head of office/mission, followed by the direct supervisor and then human resources/staff counselor. The person they reported it to was in the majority of cases a man (56%) that was part of their organization (95%).

  • The level of satisfaction reported about the way the organization handled the incident is 3.7 out of 10, with 36% of women being “not at all” satisfied.